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I have been noticing a lot of new people on the forum in the past 6 months. The point of this thread is a place for you guys to post questions that you may think are dumb. If you guys want to know something about the Jeep and can't find it using the "search" feature, post it up in here and someone will come to your rescue without biting off your head.;) Maybe Bernie can even make it a sticky and even make one of these for the "PERFORMANCE" section too. Just a thought. Ask away guys/gals......
 

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Silver & Satin
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How much is it to get a lil boy cam including everything I need?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How much is it to get a lil boy cam including everything I need?
That's kind of a loaded question. Everything you NEED vs everything could could do are two different things. Some people do springs and push rods with a cam, and some don't. Some replace the water pump while they're in there if the milage is mildly high. It can either be a mildly expensive job or a really expensive job. You'll also need a tune.

Are you doing the install yourself?
 

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I'm aware of Eric's thread. I thanked him for it. Chances are..... Eric will never post in here.:lol: This is a place where you can ask vs. starting a thread about it and have him chew your ass out. :D ;)
 

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Straight Up Beast SON!!!
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How much is it to get a lil boy cam including everything I need?
Well to start cam is 475.00, and not sure if the vendor is selling it anymore.... You can google where to buy it and see if you can even buy one....
 
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Good thread Harry.People can actually get some advice(help) even if their questions sound a lil off to some of us. Srt8 No judgement zone:)
 

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Is there any issue with having a tune (canned or custom) on a daily driver?
 

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I'm aware of Eric's thread. I thanked him for it. Chances are..... Eric will never post in here.:lol: This is a place where you can ask vs. starting a thread about it and have him chew your ass out. :D ;)
Great idea, HB...... but will posting in this thread also give you amnesty from Chad?

.
 

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Why are the leaves on trees green?????
Chlorophyll inside the chloroplasts give leaves the green color. There are other pigments in the leaves too, such as xanthophylls (yellows) and carotenoids (yellows, oranges and reds). These pigments are also used in photosynthesis but occur in lesser quantities than the green chlorophyll. The combinations of the different pigments make different shades of green. Now the reason that plants look green is that they are trying to obtain energy from the sun using a particular part of the light spectrum, mainly the red and infra red wavelengths. If you remember from your physics classes the color you see is the color that is reflected from the object, the other colors are absorbed. So in the case of green plants, the green wavelength is reflected and all the other colors, especially reds and blues, are absorbed to drive the energy cycle in the plants. Chlorophyll does best in the red (around 670 nm) and blue (around 500 nm) areas of the spectrum. That's why many plants have the additional pigments (xanthophylls and carotenoids) called accessory pigments that feed light energy to chlorophyll "a" from light. Chlorophyll is almost useless in the green part of the spectrum, and doesn't absorb that color. That is why most plants are green. There are different colors of plants too. However, that does depend a bit on where the plant lives. Many seaweeds are red or brown or blue-green in color because the red wavelengths don't penetrate water very well. In shallow water the seaweeds are still green, but as you get further and further underwater they become much more brown or red in color. That is because these plants use a different part of the light spectrum to drive the photosynthetic cycle. Another common exception to the green color are plants such as begonias. They often have red underneath the leaves and green upper surfaces. This is because begonias live in quite dark parts of the forest (the red coloured begonias get leaf burn in full sunlight). The upper green surface catches the little bit of direct light that penetrates the dense leaf canopy of the forest. The lower red leaf surface collects the red and brown colors that are reflected from the ground surface; just to get that little bit more energy. The chloroplasts are little machines that capture energy from the sun, but they do wear out. Plants have a choice, they can either keep making more machines (chloroplasts filled with chlorophyll) to replace the broken down ones, or they can close down the factory (the leaf) and begin afresh somewhere else. Evergreen plants, such as pines and tropical plants, keep replacing the broken down chloroplasts until the actual structure of the leaf starts to break down, then that particular leaf is closed down after most of the nutrients are reabsorbed. Deciduous plants, like maples, have a slightly different philosophy on life. They only make short term factories (leaves) and start reabsorbing nutrients in autumn. The reason that leaves go various shades of yellow, orange or red is because the elements that make up the chlorophyll are reabsorbed most - they are needed most in another leaf or another time to make more chlorophyll. The other pigments, such as the xanthophylls (yellows) and carotenoids (yellows, oranges and reds), are partially reabsorbed after most of the chlorophyll is gone. That is why you get those brilliant autumn colors for a while, and then everything goes a brown color. I'm not entirely sure why brown is the dead color for plants, but on the other hand whenever I try to mix paint colors to get a different shade I often end up with a muddy brown. So maybe it is just a case of the left over color combine to make a brown. Now are plants "really dead when they die?", well yes. When plants die, they are really dead. However, there are a lot of plants that have various states of dormancy. They might look as if they are dying, but actually, they are only closing the factories (leaves), packaging and storing all the nutrients and getting ready for another season next year. The maples and other deciduous trees close up shop for the winter because at such low temperatures the leaf structure is easily damaged, the chlorophyll reaction doesn't work as well either, and there is very little light available to drive the photosynthetic reaction in any case. So, the deciduous trees "sleep" over the winter, no point in wasting effort in a difficult season. Bulbs, such as tulip and onions, die back once they have achieved their purpose - to become pollinated and spread seed around. Once they've achieved that, they don't bother to stick around to be eaten. Much safer to pull your head in under ground. Saves on nutrients too, because those dang herbivores won't get them if you reabsorb them into the bulb. So, again, they aren't dead, just dormant.
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Chlorophyll inside the chloroplasts give leaves the green color. There are other pigments in the leaves too, such as xanthophylls (yellows) and carotenoids (yellows, oranges and reds). These pigments are also used in photosynthesis but occur in lesser quantities than the green chlorophyll. The combinations of the different pigments make different shades of green. Now the reason that plants look green is that they are trying to obtain energy from the sun using a particular part of the light spectrum, mainly the red and infra red wavelengths. If you remember from your physics classes the color you see is the color that is reflected from the object, the other colors are absorbed. So in the case of green plants, the green wavelength is reflected and all the other colors, especially reds and blues, are absorbed to drive the energy cycle in the plants. Chlorophyll does best in the red (around 670 nm) and blue (around 500 nm) areas of the spectrum. That's why many plants have the additional pigments (xanthophylls and carotenoids) called accessory pigments that feed light energy to chlorophyll "a" from light. Chlorophyll is almost useless in the green part of the spectrum, and doesn't absorb that color. That is why most plants are green. There are different colors of plants too. However, that does depend a bit on where the plant lives. Many seaweeds are red or brown or blue-green in color because the red wavelengths don't penetrate water very well. In shallow water the seaweeds are still green, but as you get further and further underwater they become much more brown or red in color. That is because these plants use a different part of the light spectrum to drive the photosynthetic cycle. Another common exception to the green color are plants such as begonias. They often have red underneath the leaves and green upper surfaces. This is because begonias live in quite dark parts of the forest (the red coloured begonias get leaf burn in full sunlight). The upper green surface catches the little bit of direct light that penetrates the dense leaf canopy of the forest. The lower red leaf surface collects the red and brown colors that are reflected from the ground surface; just to get that little bit more energy. The chloroplasts are little machines that capture energy from the sun, but they do wear out. Plants have a choice, they can either keep making more machines (chloroplasts filled with chlorophyll) to replace the broken down ones, or they can close down the factory (the leaf) and begin afresh somewhere else. Evergreen plants, such as pines and tropical plants, keep replacing the broken down chloroplasts until the actual structure of the leaf starts to break down, then that particular leaf is closed down after most of the nutrients are reabsorbed. Deciduous plants, like maples, have a slightly different philosophy on life. They only make short term factories (leaves) and start reabsorbing nutrients in autumn. The reason that leaves go various shades of yellow, orange or red is because the elements that make up the chlorophyll are reabsorbed most - they are needed most in another leaf or another time to make more chlorophyll. The other pigments, such as the xanthophylls (yellows) and carotenoids (yellows, oranges and reds), are partially reabsorbed after most of the chlorophyll is gone. That is why you get those brilliant autumn colors for a while, and then everything goes a brown color. I'm not entirely sure why brown is the dead color for plants, but on the other hand whenever I try to mix paint colors to get a different shade I often end up with a muddy brown. So maybe it is just a case of the left over color combine to make a brown. Now are plants "really dead when they die?", well yes. When plants die, they are really dead. However, there are a lot of plants that have various states of dormancy. They might look as if they are dying, but actually, they are only closing the factories (leaves), packaging and storing all the nutrients and getting ready for another season next year. The maples and other deciduous trees close up shop for the winter because at such low temperatures the leaf structure is easily damaged, the chlorophyll reaction doesn't work as well either, and there is very little light available to drive the photosynthetic reaction in any case. So, the deciduous trees "sleep" over the winter, no point in wasting effort in a difficult season. Bulbs, such as tulip and onions, die back once they have achieved their purpose - to become pollinated and spread seed around. Once they've achieved that, they don't bother to stick around to be eaten. Much safer to pull your head in under ground. Saves on nutrients too, because those dang herbivores won't get them if you reabsorb them into the bulb. So, again, they aren't dead, just dormant.
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More like Borophyll!
 

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Great idea but I see this thread deteriorating quickly into silliness...subscribed. Lol
 

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Great idea, HB...... but will posting in this thread also give you amnesty from Chad?

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Trust me when I say this.....there is no such thing.
 

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I have been noticing a lot of new people on the forum in the past 6 months. The point of this thread is a place for you guys to post questions that you may think are dumb. If you guys want to know something about the Jeep and can't find it using the "search" feature, post it up in here and someone will come to your rescue without biting off your head.;) Maybe Bernie can even make it a sticky and even make one of these for the "PERFORMANCE" section too. Just a thought. Ask away guys/gals......
Good idea Harrison and it's a sticky now. I changed the title to add "WK1", thinking another one in the WK2 General Discussion forum would be a good idea perhaps. Lets not forget the How To section and I hope members will link to those threads if it's been covered.

I was also thinking one of these threads in General Performance Discussion is good, but to have the title clearly indicate it's for "dumb general performance questions" or something like that so as to not have questions of a general nature in it that are more appropriate in this thread.

Bernie
 

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Great idea, HB...... but will posting in this thread also give you amnesty from Chad?

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Trust me when I say this.....there is no such thing.
Ouch! :fight: I will continue to monitor outside of this thread and point them to this safe zone along with Google.
 

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1.how much over ambient temp is acceptable for a charge temp when making a high boost pass at the track?

2.what are the possible pitfalls/dangers of a high charge temp?

3. what can one do to avoid high charge temps or at least keep them best controlled?
 

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Silver & Satin
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3,750 Posts
That's kind of a loaded question. Everything you NEED vs everything could could do are two different things. Some people do springs and push rods with a cam, and some don't. Some replace the water pump while they're in there if the milage is mildly high. It can either be a mildly expensive job or a really expensive job. You'll also need a tune.

Are you doing the install yourself?
No, I'm not
So I want to do everything that is recommended do you know that price?
 
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