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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a nail in my run flat P Zero and found out they can't be repaired. On top of that America/Discount tire has no availability except to order from Atlanta. I am in San Diego so that means I wait a week. The tire is loosing 20 lbs of air every 24 hours. What a PIA. Can t believe that I have to throw away a 500 dollar tire with 3,000 miles. Ridicolous.
 

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The Traveler
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some bad news. Sorry to hear it. You try patching it yourself or use some tire sealant? Seems it can't hurt to try.

I must say, for those that question spares with run flats. Perfect example. I had to wait 2 weeks for my Runflats one time. Stores don't seem to carry large Runflats these days.


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I can't stress enough the importance of getting the tire/wheel warranty with these vehicles. With tires at $500 each and rims at $1300, it pays for itself if you only use it once. Best decision i made with this purchase.
 

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some bad news. Sorry to hear it. You try patching it yourself or use some tire sealant? Seems it can't hurt to try.

I must say, for those that question spares with run flats. Perfect example. I had to wait 2 weeks for my Runflats one time. Stores don't seem to carry large Runflats these days.


Sent from my iPhone 4S

Sealants don't work on runflats. (I've tried it in the past)

+1 on tire/wheel insurance.....definately worth it if you have expensive tires/rims

I just don't understand the existence of runflats.....they suck.....they're not any more durable than regular tires, are harder to obtain, make ride quality worse, and performance is mediocre.
 

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Maybe just buy a set of real performance tires for half the price and try and sell the other tires to a used tire place. Then in the future you will not have to worry if you get a nail. Plus the car will handle even better. I personally think the tires suck for a performance car, especially if you live in a climate with no snow.
 

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Marathon Man
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I've had runflats repaired in the past without any issues as long as the hole wasn't in the sidewall of the tire.
 

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i have had run flats for years and plug them. They repair fine. Actually did one myself in a walmart parking lot in 5 minutes.
For the love of god......that's not how you repair a tire.:eek: You have to dismount the tire, plug it, and patch it on the inside.



I've had runflats repaired in the past without any issues as long as the hole wasn't in the sidewall of the tire.

Every manufacturer has a different view on this. Goodyear allows repairs on their run-flats, but only if the puncture is in the tread section. The kicker is that the speed rating is lost......making the tire pretty much useless. Most other tire manufacturers say to just replace the damaged tire, because the durability of the tire is weakened.



This is from tire rack:

One of the last sights drivers want to see when they are getting ready to drive their vehicle is a flat tire. They realize that in addition to the immediate inconvenience of having to install their spare tire, they will have to get the punctured tire repaired. And if their tire is a steel belted radial (and whose isn't?), it must be repaired immediately to minimize potential long term deterioration started by the puncture. A punctured speed rated tire brings with it additional considerations. While some tire manufacturers "allow" a tire to retain its speed rating if a specified multi-step repair procedure is followed exactly, most tire manufacturers reason that since they have no control over the damage caused by the puncture or the quality of the repair, they cannot confirm that the tire has retained its high speed capability. Therefore, their policy is that a punctured and repaired tire no longer retains its speed rating and should be treated as a non-speed rated tire.
While almost any sharp object left on the road can cause a puncture, most are caused by small nails and screws (typically less than 1/4" in diameter).
Guidelines allow the repair of punctures in a tire's tread area of up to 1/4" in diameter. Repair of larger tread punctures and of punctures to the tire's shoulder and sidewall areas are not recommended.
There are three primary considerations when repairing a punctured tire. You need to evaluate the damage the object caused as it punctured the tire, reestablish an airtight seal of the tire's innerliner, and completely fill the path the object took through the tire. Typically a mushroom-shaped patch and plug combination repair is considered to be the best method of repairing a punctured steel belted radial.
Any repair attempted without removing the tire from the wheel is improper. Without inspecting the inside of the tire for hidden damage comes the risk of returning a weakened tire to service. Punctures in the tread area that looked repairable have revealed upon further investigation that the object that punctured the tire had been long enough to cut the tire's sidewall from the inside. Without dismounting the tire, the hidden damage would have been missed.
Simply plugging a tire from the outside without removing the tire from the wheel is improper. (If a tire is punctured while off-roading far away from civilization and a spare tire isn't available, a plug may serve as a temporary low speed solution that must be replaced with a proper repair as soon as possible upon returning to the road.)
Additionally, any repair that doesn't completely fill the path the object took through the tire is incomplete. While a patch on the inside of the tire reseals the innerliner, it does not fill the path of the puncture. This will allow moisture to reach the steel belts and/or the casing cords causing them to rust or deteriorate.
There are many different rubber compounds used in a tire. The tire's innerliner uses a special rubber compound that has the ability to better retain air. Once punctured, the innerliner must be cleaned, buffed, cemented, patched and coated to assure its ability to retain air has been restored. Since this can only be done from inside the tire, it's another reason that a plug-only repair is improper.
Continuing to drive on a tire with a slow leak may allow moisture to seep around the object and into the tire. This will reduce the probability that the tire can be repaired properly because the moisture will ultimately reach the internal steel and fabric cords used to reinforce the tire and possibly cause rust and loss of strength. To assure reestablishing a watertight seal the injury must be cleaned with a specially designed cutting drill that removes rust and sizes the injury properly to accept the rubber stem of the patch. Cemented in place, the stem will vulcanize with the tire to help prevent moisture from reaching the tire's reinforcing cords from the outside.
While indoor laboratory tests have shown that freshly punctured and properly repaired speed rated tires can still achieve high speeds, it is not recommended that repaired street tires, or punctured DOT-legal competition tires and racing slicks be used for track events.
How do you know which procedures a tire dealer uses? Ask them! But be aware that if they say they can repair a tire in 10 minutes for under $10 dollars without removing it from the wheel, they aren't following the Rubber Manufacturer's Association procedures. A correctly done flat repair that follows the multi-step repair procedures will take approximately 30 minutes and probably cost around $20. Driving on an improperly repaired tire is dangerous because it can further damage the tire and/or allow its strength to deteriorate over time. An improperly repaired tire driven at high speeds may suddenly fail, causing loss of vehicle control. Additionally, the use of an innertube as a substitute for a proper repair generates additional heat and should not be considered.
 

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I've always plugged holes myself using cords with perfect results. I go one further. I apply tire glue to the cord, pop it thru the tire so that at least 1" extends inside. Then I light the exposed outside cord and try to get it to melt evenly over a period of about 30-60 seconds. I have never, ever had any problems, except when trying to plug a leak on the sidewall as was mentioned above.

So I was about to poo-poo the claim that a leak needs to be patched and plugged as well. But when you think about it, how smart is it to drive 130MPH while betting your safety on a plug or cord. Although again, I personally run the cord thru the hole completely, so there is a part of the glue-soaked cord on the inside. I dunno..... :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK....so you can't repair a run flat but Pirelli made good and warrantied it for no charge. Only cost me $16.75 for labor. So the Pirelli's live to fight another fight. I have been looking for non run flat options when the Pireli's wear out and there are not many options. Might even consider getting the Verdes instead of the Pzero next time as the tread wear on the Pzero is only
220 vs the Verdes at 400.
 
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