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I had the BC Racing Coil Overs (BR-Type) and Jeeping by Al Upper Control Arms (JBA-UCA) installed on my silver 2009 Jeep SRT8 about two weeks ago. I figured I should give them a review for other people on the fence and provide some tips & tricks (how to) for new owners trying to get them dialed in just right.

The BC Racing custom coilovers for the WK1 Jeep SRT8’s are BR type. What does this mean? According to BC Racing’s website “Our BR Type model is the perfect choice for street driving and the occasional road course or autocross duty. With easily accessible adjustment knobs for fine-tuning your compression and rebound, plus a separately adjustable ride height, having a performance coilover system could not be any easier. You choose how low or high you want your vehicle to sit (no pre-set ride height here) and our patented concave lower locking ring keeps it locked in securely. Our systems offer optional pillow ball mounts to provide the most feedback possible from your suspension and to sharpen your steering response. Our available front and rear camber plates also allow you to get the perfect alignment setup without compromise. BC Racing offers all of these features while providing a strong, attractive-looking coilover system at a reasonable price.”

  • Mono-tube shock design
  • Full height adjustability through the shock body (not spring)
  • 30 levels of damping adjustment (compression/rebound)
  • Front camber plates are included on all applicable kits
  • Rear camber plates included on certain applications
  • Custom spring rates available as well as a SWIFT spring upgrade (upon request)
  • 1-year warranty against manufacturer defect
  • Completely rebuildable and individual parts are available separately for purchase

Front shock, rear stock, rear spring, and adjustment spanner (2x in the box):


I was very apprehensive about upgrading my suspension/shocks because; I didn’t know how it would handle/ride after, I was concerned about the durability/craftsmanship (compared to stock Bilstein's) and most of all I was concerned about the safety (daily driven with two car seats). Well, I’m happy to say that the ride and handling have vastly improved (night and day) with the BC Racing Coilover setup. Before the installation my Jeep use to sidestep (badly) over elevated highway joints and bumps (very unsafe feeling). When I first got my SRT8 I took it to the dealer few times to get the side stepping issue fix but they never could figure it out, they just concluded “it’s normal” (no more side step at all with the BC Racing coilovers). The craftsmanship is top notch and the coilovers come with a 1yr warranty (good enough for the price).

I received the packages shortly after placing my orders and proceeded to unbox each item. Being the detailing nut I am, I coated each part with a sealant (not a coating) in order to provide added protection during the (endless) winter months (also made a mess with the white lithium grease). I took the time to play with the coilover adjustments but not the spring preload prior to installation. I ended up setting the rears all the way down but couldn’t find any details what height to set the fronts to I left them stock (for the installation).









I had the BC Racing coilovers and JBA UCA’s installed by a local installer shop I use and found the installation cost to be very reasonable ($200 for all four corners including JBA UCA – no alignment or adjustments). Upon seeing my Jeep, (post installation) it was clear there were a lot of adjustments to made (front was raised up from stock, and the rear was slammed). Note: removed bump stops and bump stop cups for rear stocks.



When I got home I started by measuring the distance from the ground (road) to the highest point of the fender arch to get my height (33 inches in the front and 30 inches the rear). I proceeded to lift the front (one wheel at a time) and took more measurements (distance between the lower and middle height adjustment collars). I then adjusted the height to the lowest setting possible and took more measurements (distance between the lower and middle height adjustment collars was 3.5 inches). The lowering is done by loosening the lowest collar (turn counter clockwise), then once loosened use the top-most adjustment collar to lower the sock into the mount (turn the top collar clockwise). This will not affect spring preload because your turning the collar in such a way that it’s tightening against the collar below it and causing the entire shock assembly to turn into the lower mounting point thus reducing the height of the shock and the height of your car (rather than effecting the spring preload). When raising you need to loosen the lower collar again but use the middle collar to extend (unscrew) the shock and in turn raise the ride height (turn middle collar counter-clockwise). Just like with the other adjustment the middle collar will try to tighten against the top collar but can’t so the whole shock will start to turn from its lower mounting base and increase in length without affecting the spring preload. The best part is that you don’t need to remove the wheels to adjust the height!

I didn’t end up making a video how to adjust them because I happened to come across one that was already made:

Needless to say I played with the height adjustment till I was blue in the face (6 different ride height adjustments total – for the front). The first thing I did was lower it to the max (3.5 inches collar to collar or 29 inches ground to fender in the front 30 inches in the back with rear adjustment collars still on). I liked the look but not the ride, my JBA UCA were rubbing on the plastic inner wheel guard and I had to cut it a bit to make space. I went for another test drive and was still bottoming out (front shock compressing to its maximum and making a loud thud/bang) on only some large potholes I hit. On smooth roads it was a dream but it was too much bottoming out for my taste so I raised the front 1.5inches (it measured 5 inches from lower adjustment collar to mid collar). Much to my surprise the 1.5 inches of lift on the shock was somehow exaggerated by the other suspension components when dropping the car back on to the street. I went from 29inchs in the front up to 32 ¾ inches from the ground to the top of the fender arch (3 ¾ inches height change for a 1 ½ inch raise on the shock)… I hit the drawing boards with the numbers I had and decided to lower the shocks another 1 inch so that they would be 0.5 inches from lowest possible setting and took it out for a ride…

Setting shocks at 3.5 inches collar to collar (as low as they can go):





3.5 inch collar to collar stance:




Setting shocks at 5inch collar to collar:



5 inch collar to collar stance:





5inch collar to collar ride height:


Worked night and day to get them set up just right:


Setting stocks at (my) ideal height of 4inchs from collar to collar:




4inch collar to collar stance:





4inch collar to collar ride height:


The test drive was a huge contrast to the previous test drive. This time it didn’t bottom out once and there was no more JBA-UCA rubbing. The ride was sublime! I went back home to take height measurements from the street to the fender and to commence adjust/tune the damping. The final ride height is 30 3/4 inches in the front and 30 inches in the rear around.

Next I moved on to adjusting the dampening (no pictures sorry, it’s easy to do). To tune the dampening you will need to unclip your middle fuse box (4 tabs need to be pushed in simultaneously and lift the fuse box) to access the drivers side shock tower top. Once you have access to the top of the shock, just slide the adjustment Allen-key-nob into the top of the shock and turn to full firmness (the goal is to tune out the pogo effect at low speeds and all adjustments should be made by going full firm and then back down to the desired setting). The passenger side shock tower is under the coolant tank which is very easy to remove. My coolant tank only had one screw and a plastic push pin holding it in place. I set both front shocks to the stiffest setting and took a cruse (I didn’t play with the adjustment on the rears). I noticed the ride was just slightly too soft (bouncy/pogo) so I dropped the firmness by two clicks (28/30) and continued my test drive. I noticed there was much less bounciness at slow speed but there was still some, so I dropped it down another two clicks (26/30) and hit the road. This time it felt just right (yeah like the 3 little bears). I bent down to play with the rears and took note of the stock setting (lost the paper I wrote it on), I did the same thing in the end I keep making the rears softer and softer until they were back down to the factory setting and found this was the best setting for the rear damping.

There was only one thing left to do…. Wash it! Who am I kidding it was time for the semi-final test drive. I was thoroughly delighted with every aspect of the ride height and shock dampening at all speeds. Next it was time for the alignment as it was visually obvious I had a lot of positive camber. As alignments have always been a total bleeping mystery to me I took it to a high-end alignment shop that had many exotic cars under their belt (pictures of Lambo’s and Ferrari’s all over the wall, even a few SRT’s). The alignment was costly IMHO at $127…

My Jeep was finally ready for a grand tour of Montreal so I canceled all my plans for the day, turned off my cell phones, took off my watch, filled her with gas, picked up a 6 pack, rolled a phatty, and turned up the music. Needless to say I felt like Jeremy Clarkson from Top Gear with all these imaginative phrases that I planned to use to describe the handling but I was totally overcome by the drive. The best way I can put it to you is; it’s like a chick that’s too hot to describe and has to be seen in person to do it justice. I drove like never before, weaving in and out of traffic like a crotch rocket, over speed bumps, on the roughest roads, trough expressway tunnels at double the speed limit, even went on a 300 year old cobble stone road and never once did the BC Racing coilovers disappoint! I quickly lost count of all the turned heads and broken necks on my tour. I finished off at the local car meet spot (Orange Julep) for some more refreshments and food.

Photograph of the Orange Julep:


I absolutely recommend the shocks and I’d go as far as to say they have been the single best mod I’ve done up to date. *I likely feel this way about the coilovers because my other shocks had been broken for quite some time…

Note: I will not disclose the price/cost of the BC Racing Coilovers or JBA - UCA as requested by the vendor because I’m located in Canada it only further complicates the pricing issue.

P.S. I plan to update this thread regarding the durability of the shocks over the next year (let’s see if they hold up to Canadian winters and the crazy pothole infested roads)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
FAQ:

Q: How long do the coilovers take to adjust (ride height)?
A: About 10 minutes with a quick jack (no need to take wheels off). It obviously took me longer as I had to take photos and mesurements.

Q: I played with my spring preload (top adjustment collars) how do I set it back correctly?
A: Tighten the top adjustment collar by hand until it hits the spring, then bring up the middle adjustment collar until it touches the top one (not too tight just touching), then get the spanner tool and tighten the top adjustment collar (one touching the spring) until the spanner tool handle (thin side) can fit between the adjustment collars (top and middle). This will be approximately 4mm of preload (5/32nds) as they were from the factory. Any deviation is not recommended and could have adverse effects (from what I read, I didn't play with the preload).
 

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Very nice write up. Thanks for sharing!
 
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Fantastic setup man....Looks like a Great Mod!
 
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I'm sure it rides like a dream... They used my jeep as a template years ago to make the A-arms. My buddy was working for the guy who owned the company at the time.
 

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Hey was considering this exact same set up.
But not sure which vendor would give the best price as I am in Canada to Ive heard people getting them for like 1300 but the jba's not sure.
I wouldn't want to slam it though roads are bad here in Edmonton.Plus winter and all.
I wouldn't mind dropping an inch or so and i would keep the raked look.
Maybe some vendors would chime in on pricing.
Also any updates still glad with your purchase?
 
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Yeah, I'm more than glad with my purchase. There are some pro's/con's...

Pro's:
Handling never ceases to amaze
Fully adjustable for any situation (road trip, daily, car show, autocross, drag)
Lowered look
Flat cornering/acceleration/deceleration
Much less roll (might have to do with end links and UCA's)
No "dive"
Quality parts that are holding up to my abuse (roads are terrible and I'm low)
Doesn't scrape on speed bumps or at high speeds

Con's:
You'll drive even more aggressively with the improved handling
Handels best if adjusted for driving situation (no "set it and forget it")
Rubbing (minor trim to all 4 splash guards)
Bottoming out (front hits bump stops over sharp drops, rear end hits exhaust)

Below are some pictures I took now that the shocks have settled (daily ride height):










P.S. PM Jim from FB group about shocks
 
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Discussion Starter #11
did they not send you the HID auto leveler bracket with the arms?
NO! They didn't... I just set them manually although I did pay for the "speed sensor" thing but only got the UCA (I figured that was the part for the HID's)...

Note: they are definitely better with the leveler than without unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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I installed My BR type BC coilover this weekend, install was pretty easy once I figured out i need to disconnect the sway bar.

I installed the front at the lowest position, can't fit a shoes in there, and the rear at the factory height the BC were set at, still lower than stock chocks, i don't like it too low in the back.
I haven't adjusted the firmness yet so i'm at 8 click from hard and it is pretty hard lol.

So far I like it but its a pretty rough ride, still better than my busted 9y old blisten. The front upper control arm hit a little on the frame but nothing too dramatic and it doesn't happen too often, I saw in a thread that you can cut a hole there but i'm likely going to set it just a little higher from lowest.

The handling is amassing, now it really drive like a sport car. Going to play with the adjustment a bit then will to an alignment, its a bit off right now but i don't care about these tires so i'm not in a hurry, gonna find the sweet spot in height and firmness before.

Thanks 4u2nvinmtl for that great write up!

 
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Ugh... another case of a great write-up f'd up by photobucket.
 
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Yeah sorry I'm not paying Photobucket's $299 a month ransom to fix my posts. To bad it's basically impossible to edit my original post with new links...
 
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Yeah sorry I'm not paying Photobucket's $299 a month ransom to fix my posts. To bad it's basically impossible to edit my original post with new links...
How are those BC coilovers holding up? Would you buy them again if you had to do it all over? I am debating between these and eibach lowering springs. I know that both have their cons. Some members report that eibachs don't seem to compress as much after a while. It's my daily...and I am in a northern state with salt on the roads in the winter...so QA rear shocks are kind of out of the picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How are those BC coilovers holding up?
Excellently! No issues so far other than one of the rear shocks started to move up/out of the adjustment sleeve (got lose on it's own just make sure you tighten the adjustment collars very well).
I daily drive my 2009 Jeep SRT8 year round and these socks have taken some serious punishment (winter drift track at -40, spring pot holes).
I am starting to see some rust on the front springs and on the shocks them self's from all the salt put on the winter roads (kind of surprised the coating I applied didn't protect better)

Would you buy them again if you had to do it all over?
Yes I would but I'd get the upgraded springs as the regular ones are smaller than stock (not only shorter but smaller also).

I am debating between these and eibach lowering springs. I know that both have their cons. Some members report that eibachs don't seem to compress as much after a while. It's my daily...and I am in a northern state with salt on the roads in the winter...so QA rear shocks are kind of out of the picture.
So every owner I meet with Eibach's wishes they had the BC coil-overs after riding in my jeep. Regarding the QA1's I also had those for a while but they didn't last through the winter (seals broke as well as adjustment nob from the extreme cold and dirt build up as there's no protection sleeve over the shocks)

Considering you live in a similar area to me I'd recommend the BC coil-overs over all the other possibility's. The key is getting them set up right. Don't just go all the way low, play with the height to get the right stance and handling characteristics (I bought these to improve handling first and lower second). If you only want to go low maybe the Eibachs are better...

Here's a video of my jeep blasting up the driveway last winter with the coil-overs. Just to show the type of daily punishment I put it through.

 
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Thanks for the meaningful and very helpful reply!!! Quick question - what do you mean by upgraded (vs. regular) springs? Don't BC coilovers already come with springs? I just checked MarylandSpeed and I didn't see an option for "upgraded" springs. What specific springs are you referring and where did you buy them if you don't mind sharing? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #19

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good day,
i have installed this front & rear recently and have made some sound in the rear itself - clunking, like the item is not seated very well.. mine is a 2010 JGC SRT8
 
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